Fiskerton

The Fiskerton solar plant is built on a disused WWII Bomber Command airfield in Lincolnshire.  It uses Q-Cells modules for a total peak capacity of 12.9 MW.

The plant was connected in March 2015. Lark Energy was the EPC contractor. The project has a 25-year site lease and planning permission in place for an equivalent period.

Revenues are derived from a mixture of ROCs (at 1.4 ROCs per MWh), LECs and power sales.

Asset management is provided by Armstrong Energy and operations and maintenance management services is provided by Lark Energy.

Hale Farm

The Hale Farm solar plant uses Q-Cells modules for a total peak capacity of 12.2 MW.

The plant was connected in March 2015. Lark Energy was the EPC contractor. The project has a 25-year site lease and planning permission in place for an equivalent period.

Revenues are derived from a mixture of ROCs (at 1.4 ROCs per MWh), LECs and power sales.

Asset management is provided by Armstrong Energy and operations and maintenance management services is provided by Lark Energy.

Chalgrove

With a total peak capacity of 22.0 MW, Chalgrove is our largest solar farm.  It uses LDK modules and was connected in March 2015.

Lark Energy was the EPC contractor. The project has a 25-year site lease and planning permission in place for an equivalent period.

Revenues are derived from a mixture of ROCs (at 1.4 ROCs per MWh), LECs and power sales.

Asset management is provided by Armstrong Energy and operations and maintenance management services is provided by Lark Energy.

Nether Mill

The Nether Mill solar plant uses LDK modules for a total peak capacity of 3.8 MW.

The plant was connected in March 2015.  “Ethical Power” was the EPC contractor. The project has a 25-year site lease and planning permission in place for an equivalent period.

Revenues are derived from a mixture of ROCs (at 1.4 ROCs per MWh), LECs and power sales.

Asset management is provided by Armstrong Energy and operations and maintenance management services is provided by “Ethical Power”.

Langford

The Langford solar plant uses LDK modules for a total peak capacity of 13.0 MW.

The plant was connected in March 2015. Lark Energy was the EPC contractor. The project has a 25-year site lease and planning permission in place for an equivalent period.

Revenues are derived from a mixture of ROCs (at 1.4 ROCs per MWh), LECs and power sales.

Asset management is provided by Armstrong Energy and operations and maintenance management services is provided by Lark Energy.

Taunton

The Taunton solar plant uses Chint Astronergy modules for a total peak capacity of 1.8 MW.

The plant was connected in March 2015. “Ethical Power” was the EPC contractor. The project has a 25-year site lease and planning permission in place for an equivalent period.

Revenues are derived from a mixture of ROCs (at 1.4 ROCs per MWh), LECs and power sales.

Asset management is provided by Armstrong Energy and operations and maintenance management services is provided by Ethical Power.

Kenninghall

The Kenninghall solar plant uses LDK modules for a total peak capacity of 8.0 MW.

The plant was connected in March 2015. Lark Energy was the EPC contractor. The project has a 25-year site lease and planning permission in place for an equivalent period.

Revenues are derived from a mixture of ROCs (at 1.4 ROCs per MWh), LECs and power sales.

Asset management is provided by Armstrong Energy and operations and maintenance management services is provided by Lark Energy.

SECOND SOLAR FARM CONNECTED BY ARMSTRONG ENERGY GLOBAL

Armstrong Energy Global Limited is pleased to announce the grid connection of its second solar farm in India. The solar farm is in Hatnura, Telangana and is providing electricity to a major construction company.

Managing Director, Ram Nandakumar said, “Thanks to our strong in-country team, the construction of this plant has smoothly proceeded to plan and is now generating significant clean energy in a region that urgently needs reliable sources of electricity. As with our first site at Rajahmundry, we have demonstrated that we have the team to deliver significant solar projects on budget. We are now looking forward to delivering the next phase of projects in 2015, with the aim of installing more than 100 MWp in India in the next 12 months.”

For more information, please contact Ram Nandakumar on ramnath@armstrongenergyglobal.com

 

 

 

UK Solar (Hartwell) LLP connects 18.6MW solar farm to the grid

UK Solar (Hartwell) LLP has connected an 18.6MWp solar farm in Hartwell, Northamptonshire.

The project is situated on a 103-acre site and is expected to generate around 18.5 million kilowatt hours of renewable energy per year, sufficient to power approximately 5,500 homes.

Armstrong Energy advised on the project which was constructed by Lark Energy, one of the leading developers and contractors in the UK solar market, using panels manufactured by Q-Cells.

The project has been designed to operate in synergy with the surrounding farmland over the course of its 25 year life, after which the equipment will be removed and the site restored to its original state.

Andrew Newman, Director of Armstrong Energy, commented “This is the largest project we have connected to date, and is a testament to how well we continue to work with Lark Energy.”

CONNECTION FOR MICRO GRID FUNDED BY ARMSTRONG ENERGY GLOBAL FOUNDATION

Funded by the Armstrong Energy Global Foundation, a solar mini grid has been successfully installed and connected in the remote rural village of Neelakantarayanagaddi in Karnataka, India as a social project. The 1.2 kWp system has provided a light and mobile charging to 44 households, who live on an island in the Krishna river.  The installation was carried out by SELCO India, an award-winning social enterprise based in Bangalore. The community is paying for the ongoing maintenance on the site, using their budget that they previously used on kerosene lamps which are both polluting and bad for health.

Managing Director of Armstrong Energy Global, Dr Ram Nandakumar, said, “We welcome the news that this mini solar grid has now been connected. It is a tribute to the SELCO team who have worked hard in a challenging remote environment to install such a valuable source of reliable electricity for the local community.  It is well recognised that the transition from kerosene lighting to solar energy is a major step forward in helping households enjoy less air pollution and create a much more positive environment to live and work.”

Armstrong Energy Global Foundation’s social projects are funded from a percentage of the revenue from Armstrong Energy Global Limited’s commercial solar activities in India.  The Foundation aims to switch on access to energy for one million people who currently do not have access to reliable energy.